CFS3
Center for Food Safety and Security Systems
Courses Catalog

Overview of Risk Analysis

Course Description

This one day course pulls together the basic principles of risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication. The target audience is newer members of the risk analysis community.

It is a generic overview with some focus on food safety from an international perspective, and serves as a contextual primer for anyone interested in or involved with a broad range of risk analysis activities, regardless of application.

The course:
Provides an introduction to the terminology, concepts, tools and techniques used in food safety risk analysis. Acquaints students with the predominant risk analysis models. Provides an overview of the tasks and issues associated with risk management and risk communication. Introduces some of the tools of risk assessment.

Past participants have included:

  • Health Inspector – Food and Environmental Hygiene Department
  • Senior Nutrition Specialist – Saudi Food and Drug Authority
  • Scientific Officer – Ministry of Food and Drug Safety
  • Chemist – FDA
  • Analyst, Land O’ Lakes

Package Options:
*This course is also available as part of the CORE Package Program

Prerequisite: None

It is strongly recommended that this course be taken before others in the JIFSAN series.

Risk Overview

Introduction:

  • Risk is Everywhere
  • Why Do Risk Analysis?
  • A Risk Analysis Model
  • Risk Analysis Tasks Intuitively Defined
  • Formal Definitions
  • Alternatives to Risk Analysis
  • Internet Resources
  • Starting a Risk Analysis Library?

Risk Management:

  • We Manage Risks All the Time
  • Risk Management Defined
  • Risk Management Is Where Values Enter The Process
  • Risk Management Models
  • Risk Management Options
  • Risk Management Decision-Making Principles

Risk Assessment:

  • It's a Risky World
  • The Risk Managers' Role in Assessment
  • Risk Assessment Defined
  • Risk Assessment Questions
  • Risk Assessment Answers
  • Risk Assessors' Toolbox
  • Criteria Based Ranking Tools
  • Probabilistic Scenario Analysis
  • Sensitivity Analysis
  • What Makes A Good Risk Assessment?

Risk Communication:

  • A Starting Point
  • What We Worry About
  • What Drives Risk Communication?
  • Factors Affecting Outrage
  • Misunderstanding Risk
  • A Brief History of Risk Communication
  • Risk Communication Tasks
  • Internal Risk Communication
  • External Risk Communication
  • Subtleties of Language

Risk Management

Course Description

Risk Management in the context of food safety is- the process of weighing policy alternatives to control risks as effectively as possible. Risk managers are the decision makers. Success in risk management means arriving at practical and useful solutions to problems that are often plagued by uncertainty. Risk managers begin and end all risk analysis activities, they are responsible for the risk analysis process.

This 3-day in classroom course is about getting to the final decision. It is designed not just for decision makers but also for all those who will work with decision makers.

It is strongly recommended that this course be taken after you have completed our Overview of Risk Analysis course. The Overview course provides contextual information about risk analysis that is not repeated here.

This course meets a requirement of the JIFSAN Core Certificate in Food Safety Risk Analysis

Overview of Topics

Introduction:

  • Risk is Everywhere
  • Why Do Risk Analysis?
  • A Risk Analysis Model
  • Risk Analysis Tasks Intuitively Defined
  • Formal Definitions
  • Alternatives to Risk Analysis
  • Internet Resources
  • Starting a Risk Analysis Library?

Risk Management:

  • We Manage Risks All the Time
  • Risk Management Defined
  • Risk Management Is Where Values Enter The Process
  • Risk Management Models
  • Risk Management Options
  • Risk Management Decision-Making Principles

Risk Assessment:

  • It's a Risky World
  • The Risk Managers' Role in Assessment
  • Risk Assessment Defined
  • Risk Assessment Questions
  • Risk Assessment Answers
  • Risk Assessors' Toolbox
  • Criteria Based Ranking Tools
  • Probabilistic Scenario Analysis
  • Sensitivity Analysis
  • What Makes A Good Risk Assessment?

Risk Communication:

  • A Starting Point
  • What We Worry About
  • What Drives Risk Communication?
  • Factors Affecting Outrage
  • Misunderstanding Risk
  • A Brief History of Risk Communication
  • Risk Communication Tasks
  • Internal Risk Communication
  • External Risk Communication
  • Subtleties of Language

Package Options:
This course is also available in the CORE Package Program

Learning Objectives

Paradigms and How We Think About Things

  • The Risk Manager's Role
  • The Power of the Paradigm
  • What Influences Thinking
  • How We Reason
  • Risk Analysis as a Paradigm

Risk Management Frameworks and Models

  • Defining Risk Management
  • Risk Management Principles
  • Categories of Risk Management Activities
  • Domestic and International Models
  • The U.S. FDA Framework

Getting the Question Right

  • Decision-Making Principles
  • Distinguishing Problems from Opportunities
  • Objectives and Constraints
  • Question Hierarchy
  • Risk Profiles

Making Sense of Numbers

  • Dealing with Variability and Uncertainty
  • Decision Making under Uncertainty
  • What Managers must know about the Risk Assessment Model

Risk Management Options

  • Simple Decision Rules
  • Multiple Objective Decisions
  • Multi-criteria Decision Support Model
  • Trade-offs
  • Marginal Principle
  • Sources of Management Alternatives

Interactions Between Assessors and Managers

  • Coordination and Cooperation
  • Purpose of a Risk Assessment
  • Benchmarking RM Practices
  • Characteristics of Good and Poor Teams

Qualitative Risk Assessment

Course Description

This is the original flagship course of the JIFSAN food safety risk analysis curriculum. Food Safety Risk Assessment predicts the likelihood of harm resulting from exposure to chemical, microbial and physical agents in the diet. Our 3-day in classroom course introduces the range of risk assessment approaches across a wide spectrum of food safety hazards, providing hands-on experience with both qualitative and quantitative techniques.

It is strongly recommended that this course be taken after you have completed the Overview of Risk Analysis course. The Overview course provides contextual information about risk analysis that is not repeated here.

This course meets a requirement of the JIFSAN Core Certificate in Food Safety Risk Analysis

Package Options:
This course is also available in a package in the CORE Package Program

Overview of Topics

Context of Food Safety Risk Assessment

  • Historical Development
  • Tolerable Risk
  • International Food Safety
  • Communication with Decision Makers
  • Formal Definitions

The Risk Assessor's Toolbox

  • Screening and Ranking Tools
  • Generic Processes
  • Probabilistic Scenario Analysis
  • Bayesian Methods
  • Red Book Paradigm
  • Monte Carlo Analysis

Applications

  • Food Additives
  • Microbial Risks
  • Food Security
  • Biotechnology
  • Food Contaminants

Components

  • Dealing with Variability and Uncertainty
  • Hazard Identification
  • Dose-response
  • Risk Characterization
  • Common Probability Distributions

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the fundamental reasons for doing risk analysis
  • Identify key developments in the role of risk assessment in international food safety
  • Define what screening and ranking tools are
  • Rank a list of pathogens
  • Demonstrate familiarity with the wide range of formal definitions of risk assessment and list the steps of the Codex risk assessment definition
  • Build a simple event tree
  • Differentiate variability and uncertainty in risk assessment
  • List and discuss the steps in the basic approach to food safety assessment
  • List and define the steps of the Red Book paradigm
  • Identify at least three kinds of uncertainty that can be present in a risk assessment
  • Discuss the significance of uncertainty and variability to the risk assessor
  • Discuss the significance of uncertainty and variability to the risk manager
  • Discuss the role of probability in quantitative risk assessment
  • Identify several of the more frequently used probability distributions in risk assessment
  • Describe the differences between chemical and microbial risk assessment
  • Identify aspects of bioterrorist risk assessment that distinguishes it from other risk assessments
  • Outline the conduct of a whole food risk assessment

Quantitative Risk Assessment

Quantitative Risk Assessment for Food Safety

Course Description

This course is currently taught by Greg Paoli and Todd Ruthman of Risk Sciences International.

Quantitative Risk Assessment teaches participants the basics of building and understanding quantitative risk assessment models and provides participants with the opportunity to develop, scrutinize and present Monte Carlo simulation models.

This one week course will cover basic modeling concepts, including both deterministic and probabilistic modeling approaches. Participants will be taught how to build risk assessment models using Excel with one of the more commonly-used commercial software packages (@RISK). This course will provide participants with a strong foundation in stochastic processes, probabilistic risk assessment and Monte Carlo simulation. Participants will gain a deeper understanding of the principles and mechanics of Monte Carlo simulation, build models using these principles, and learn how to analyze probabilistic models in a risk assessment context. The course will also discuss how to use data and expert opinion when building models. Participants can expect to gain hands-on experience in building and analyzing computer-based probabilistic models and experience some techniques and challenges to expect in presenting their results to various audiences. Learning by example, participants will be given exercises involving elements of real world risk assessments that are being used in current policy and risk management.

Participants should have basic knowledge of probability and statistics and intermediate level skills in using Microsoft Excel 2003. We also strongly recommend Food Safety Risk Assessment as a prerequisite to this course.

RESOURCES

Excel: There are web-based resources that provide introductory Excel 2003 training. Many such courses are available - some at no cost - like the one found at www.videoprofessor.com.

Basic Statistics: The quantitative methods courses do not require in-depth knowledge of statistics, but an understanding of basic terminology is necessary. There are web-based resources that provide information about basic theory in probability and statistics. Some examples include http://www.robertniles.com/stats and http://www.statsoft.com/textbook.

Overview of Topics

  • Going beyond terminology
  • Dimensions of validity in risk assessment
  • Introduction to modeling
  • Considerations in the design of risk assessment models
  • 5 steps of modeling
  • Deterministic modeling
  • Review of probability and introduction to probabilistic modeling
  • Probability distributions
  • A simple probability distribution: Uniform
  • Introduction to Monte Carlo simulations
  • Introductions to Triangular, Pert and Beta distribution
  • Comparing deterministic and probabilistic approaches
  • Understanding Monte Carlo Simulation
  • Bayes’ Theorem

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, participants will:

  • Understand why models are useful
  • Understand important tradeoffs in the design of models
  • Understand the differences between deterministic and stochastic models
  • Gain a strong foundation in basic probability theory and probability distributions
  • Be able to build basic probabilistic models using Excel and @RISK
  • Understand some pros and cons of other model-building environments
  • Simulation principles and techniques
  • Stochastic processes
  • Scenario and Sensitivity analysis
  • How to use data when building a model
  • How to present risk assessments and their results

Risk Communication

Course Description

Risk Communication is the interactive exchange of information and opinions about hazards and risks, risk-related factors and risk perception. This 3-day in classroom  course presents the basics of risk communication as it is practiced in the U.S.A. with applications to food safety.

While not required, it is recommended that this course be taken after you have completed our Overview of Risk Analysis course. The Overview course provides contextual information about risk analysis that is not repeated here.

This course meets a requirement of the JIFSAN Core Certificate in Food Safety Risk Analysis

Package Options:
This course is also available in a package, see:

Overview of Topics

Principles of Risk Communication

  • Defining Risk
  • Defining Risk Communication
  • Differences between Risk Communication and Crisis Communication
  • Persuasion as a Risk Communication Goal

Knowing your Audience

  • Audience Basics
  • Risk Perceptions
  • Psychographic Information
  • Self-esteem and Risk Communication
  • Involvement
  • Anxiety

The Messenger and Risk Communication

  • We Are All Risk Communicators
  • Defining Credibility
  • Expertise
  • Communicating Trust
  • Nonverbal Communication and the Messenger

Message Development

  • The Practical Aspects of Messages
  • Message Maps
  • Message Choices

Channel Choices

  • Impact and Influence
  • Channel Choices

Dealing with the Media

  • Some Basics about Journalists
  • The Media Interview
  • Interview Checklist

Learning Objectives

  • Understanding the goals of risk communication
  • Differentiating between proactive and reactive risk communication
  • Recognizing communication competence and communicator credibility
  • Understanding how to communicate expertise and trustworthiness
  • Recognizing the importance of nonverbal communication in communicating credibility
  • Knowing how to consider audience attributes
  • Understanding how self esteem, involvement, and anxiety affects risk communication
  • Understanding the phases of message design and the research that corresponds with each phase
  • Understanding the practical aspects of message design such as message timing and message organization
  • Learning the pros and cons of different channels
  • Learning how to prepare for an interview

Epidemiology for Risk Analysis

Course Description

This course provides an introduction to epidemiologic concepts, approaches, and methods. Specifically, the course will focus on epidemiology as it relates to risk assessment, foodborne outbreaks, and food safety research. The course will combine lectures with case studies and practical exercises.

Content

This three day course provides a general overview of epidemiologic principles, methods, and approaches as they relate to food safety and risk assessment. There will be case studies focused on foodborne outbreak investigation and epidemiologic study design needed for food safety research hypotheses. The target audience is food safety professionals wanting to understand the different roles and synergies of epidemiology and risk assessment in regulatory decision making.


Introduction to FDA-iRISK®

Course Description

Participants will be introduced to FDA-iRISK®, a Web-based, comparative risk assessment tool that has been available for public use since 2012. This peer-reviewed tool has many built-in functions and automated features that allow users to conduct fully probabilistic risk assessments relatively rapidly and efficiently. It enables users to build, view and share scenarios that reflect their real-world or theoretical food safety issues, without requiring extensive risk assessment modeling experience. As part of the course we will provide attendees a guided, hands-on opportunity to explore the tool and develop food-safety risk scenarios. The course is conducted in a computer teaching laboratory.

We strongly recommend Food Safety Qualitative Risk Assessment as a prerequisite to this course.


Overview of Topics

  • Introduction to FDA-iRISK
  • How does it work?
  • The engine behind FDA-iRISK
  • Building scenarios in FDA-iRISK
  • Guided walk through of working in FDA-iRISK: Getting started, building scenarios, running models, obtaining results, and more…
  • Case study 1: Microbial hazard
  • Case study 2: Chronic chemical hazard
  • Useful data sources and tools
  • Create your own scenario in FDA-iRISK 

Risk Ranking and Risk-Based Food Inspection Systems

Course Description

Many countries in the world have experienced an exponential increase in the number of food establishments that produce and market food under their jurisdiction. Authorities, however, have experienced a significant decrease in the resources (monetary and personnel) to carry out inspection and surveillance activities. This situation requires countries to optimize and focus their resources to food products and establishments that represent the highest public health risk. This is also true for the private industry where they need to focus their monitoring and verification activities to the hazards, providers and food products that pose the highest risk. This requires the use of risk ranking tools so countries can identify their food safety priorities (biological and chemical) and develop accordingly a risk-based inspection and surveillance. This can also serve as the identification of national food safety issues that will require a risk assessment.

INTENDED AUDIENCE:

This course is mainly intended for risk managers at the Ministries of Health and Agriculture in charge of food safety and also quality control and food safety managers from the food industry.

Learning Objectives

The main goal of this training is to prepare the participants to identify the food safety priorities in a country or organization and develop a risk-based inspection and surveillance system. At the end of the training the participants will be able to:

  • Become familiar with risk ranking tools (decision trees, decision matrices, multi-variate decision analysis, online software)
  • Develop their own risk ranking tools for a specific situation
  • Build a risk-based inspection and surveillance system

Tools

  • WHO Foodborne disease burden online tool
  • Multi-criteria decision analysis
  • Decision trees and decision matrices for biological and chemical hazards
  • Risk ranger
  • iRisk

Global Food Law and Regulation

Course Description

Introduction:

Currently for many countries like the US the demand for agricultural and seasonal food products are beyond their own production capacity. In response there has been an increased dependence on imported high value agriculture. At the same time food safety has received heightened attention.

Course Objective:

The overall objective of this course is to expose participants (public and private sector) of food safety regulations affecting the production and importation/exportation of food.

Summary:

Over the last couple of decades the demand for seasonal food year round has dramatically increased outstripping the US’s capacity to meet its own production. In the last ten years, imports to the US have expanded three- fold. The US is having increased dependence on imported foods traveling longer distances than ever for which the production is scattered around the world. At the same time there has been increased demand for safe food due to rising household incomes, technological improvements in measuring contaminants, and the increased media and consumer attention on the risks of food borne illness. In response, many food retailers and food service firms, particularly in developed countries, have adopted private protocols relating to residues, microbial pathogens, field and pack house operation, and traceability. Historically governments have responded with voluntary and occasional mandatory food safety programs yet with extensive changes in demand and increase reliance of products coming from abroad many countries like the US, Canada, EU are revamping their food safety approaches and laws to ensure the food is safe whether produced domestically or abroad.

Who should attend?

The course is designed for public and private sector stakeholders involved in ensuring products meet domestic and other countries food safety requirements.

Overview of Topics

  • Concepts and principles of food/public health policy and law
  • US Federal agencies and their involvement in food safety
  • The role of the EU European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in the regulatory process
  • Canadian Federal Agencies and their involvement in food safety
  • Australian/New Zealand Agencies and their involvement in food safety
  • Japanese Agencies and their involvement in food safety
  • The role of the World Trade Organization
  • Codex Alimentarius Commission and other intergovernmental organizations involved in food safety
  • The role of private standards in food safety
  • Concepts in civil liability law

Safety/Risk Assessment of Chemicals in Food*

Course Description

*This class is only available per request

This two day course provides a general overview of foodborne chemicals, how they are regulated, dietary consumption and human exposure in foods, and how chemical safety and chemical risk assessments are conducted by state, federal and international organizations (USFDA, USDA, USEPA, CDC, California, EFSA, and WHO).

Overview of Topics

  • Chemical contaminants
  • Food additives
  • Pesticides
  • Veterinary drugs
  • Assessing dietary consumption and exposure of chemicals in food
  • Safety/Risk Assessment Paradigm

 

Learning Objectives

  • Knowledge of foodborne chemical hazards
  • Understanding the difference between safety assessments and risk assessments and how to conduct these assessments
  • Overview of the types of data and information needed and used to conduct safety and risk assessment for foodborne chemical hazards
  • Insight regarding regulatory and international guidance for the conduct of chemical safety and risk assessments